Acupuncture Southend Pain

Ear Acupuncture – a modern twist on an ancient therapy

The word acupuncture literally means ‘to puncture with a needle’, but its usage is relatively new;  it was first used as a verb in 1972.  Acupuncture itself, though, has been around a long time, and it has picked up more than one way to puncture the skin along the way.  There is the Chinese system of course, but there are also the Japanese methods, as well as Vietnamese and Korean.  You will also find acupuncture in Ayurvedic tradition medicine.  There are also many micro-systems of acupuncture including facial, abdominal, scalp and head.

Acupuncture Southend Pain

Ear Acupuncture – a modern twist on an ancient therapy

My training is in Chinese acupuncture, but I also use Ear acupuncture (also known as Auriculotherapy).  The origins of using the ear as a microsystem is not actually Chinese, but French.  In the 1950’s, Doctor Paul Nogier discovered that there are anatomical correspondences associated with the image of the inverted foetus in the ear.  He observed a scar located precisely on the upper portion of the ear on several of his patients, made by a lay healer in Marseilles, had successfully treated their sciatic pain.  Based on this, Nogier was able to map the human body and its functions on the ear.

But what has this got to do with Chinese medicine? The Chinese later adopted Nogier’s findings to enhance their own understanding of the ear as a microsystem.  Large scale trials carried out in China validated Nogier’s discoveries and led to the eventual widespread acceptance of his approach.

Southend Acupuncture Pain

The anatomical representations and acupuncture points identified in the ear are therefore quite recent discoveries and cannot be considered traditional, but because of the inclusive nature of Chinese medicine and its ability to absorb ideas from outside, ear acupuncture has been embraced by TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine).

So how is ear acupuncture different to normal acupuncture? 

Well, there is no difference; people have been sticking pins in their ears (and hands, feet, abdomens, and anywhere else you can think of) to see how it affects the body, for a very long time!  Just like Acupuncture on the normal meridians, Ear Acupuncture can help with not only pain, but a wide variety of conditions.

Ear treatments have been around for a long time.  In around 450BCE Hippocrates, who studied medicine in Egypt, wrote about the Egyptian method of treating impotence by bleeding points on the back of the ear.  And just a few hundred years later (250BCE – 200CE) the Chinese began to write about points on the ear for the treatment of specific conditions.

Did you know?

  • Ear acupuncture is commonly used in the treatment of alcohol and drug withdrawal. The NADA protocol (National Acupuncture Detoxification Association) was developed in the 1970s to help people in withdrawal from narcotics and later spread to alcohol and other withdrawal problems.  It has been used to benefit disaster victims and trauma sufferers worldwide.
  • Battlefield Acupuncture is a protocol developed for the US military and has been highly effective as an emergency analgesia for wounded soldiers.It is a first line therapy used before medics can evacuate the patient and introduce pharmaceuticals.  The protocol does not require the removal of armour or clothing so it can be applied immediately in the field.
  • It has been suggested that pirates used to believe wearing a gold or silver earring would improve their eyesight. There is an acupuncture point on the earlobe called the “ear point” or “vision point” or “master sensorial.” Although there are various points on the body that may be used to improve eyesight, there are reports of people enjoying vision improvements after having their ears pierced.

What happens at an appointment?

An Ear acupuncture appointment is no different to a normal acupuncture appointment. However, it can be performed either seated or lying down, and there is no need to remove clothing.

Chinese medicine looks at the body as a whole, so I may ask you about things that at first seem unrelated to, say, the pain in your elbow.  This is because I need to ascertain that the cause of the pain is not due to something  other than playing tennis.  For example, the pain could be related to diet; research has shown that an autoimmune condition such as Rheumatoid Arthritis can be worsened by certain foods.

But it can sometimes be simpler than that.

I once saw a client who came to me with recurring left elbow pain.  After chatting with him about his lifestyle etc. he mentioned that he was a driving instructor.  It turned out that when he was working he spent most of the day with his left elbow leaning out of the window, exposed to the wind and cold! I treated him and suggested he wind the window up a bit, and the pain never returned!. No steroid injection that time, I’m happy to say.

Once the questions are over you can sit back comfortably during the treatment. Occasionally I may also use body points or Tui Na (Chinese massage) to enhance the treatment.

If you have any questions about acupuncture, or any of the topics in my blogs, please do contact me.  Find out more about me, or my treatments  here.

southend acupuncture back pain

Times they are a changing – Acupuncture and Change

Change is inevitable – defy it at your own peril!

You will have gathered from my earlier posts that change is going to happen whether you like it or not.   So perhaps it would be easier if we made more of an occasion of the changes in our lives.

It seems to me that in our society most stages of life are no longer honoured.  We celebrate birthdays and marriages, but what about the other big occasions like coming of age, a girl’s first period, the menopause, and even death?  All these landmarks in a lifetime were once celebrated, but now are gone, tucked away and difficult to talk about.

The Chinese knew about change

Over two thousand years ago Chinese doctors observed that females and males age in seven and eight year cycles respectively.  This is true to some extent; the cells of the organs do regenerate, but at different rates, as do the bones and skin.  The Chinese medical classics talk about Qi and Essence rather than cells.  The Neijing (which is basically the Chinese Medicine bible) makes it very clear that the body is in decline from around the age of thirty-five!

This is what the Chinese observed:

Women age in 7 year cycles

At seven years of age her kidney energy becomes full, her permanent teeth come in, and her hair grows long.

At fourteen years the tian kui, or fertility essence, matures, the conception and vital channels responsible for conception open, menstruation begins, and conception is possible.

At twenty-one years the kidney energy is strong and healthy, the wisdom teeth appear, and the body is vital and flourishing.

Southend back pain

At twenty-eight years the bones and tendons are well developed and the hair and secondary sex characteristics are complete.  This is the height of female development.

At thirty-five years the stomach and large intestine channels that govern the major facial muscles begin to deplete, the muscles begin to atrophy, facial wrinkles appear, and the hair begins to thin.

At forty-two all three yang channels are exhausted, the entire face is wrinkled, and the hair begins to turn grey.

At forty-nine years the conception and vital channels are completely empty, and the tien kui has dried up.  Hence, the flow of the menses ceases and the woman is no longer able to conceive.

Men age in 8 year cycles

At eight years of age the kidney energy becomes full, the permanent teeth appear, and the hair becomes long.

At sixteen years of age the kidney energy is ample, the tien kui is mature, and the Jing is ripe, so procreation is possible.

At twenty-four years the kidney qi is abundant, the bones and tendons grow strong, and the wisdom teeth come in.

At the thirty-second year the body is at the peak of strength, and functions of the male are at their height.

southend fertility

By forty the kidney qi begins to wane, teeth become loose, and the hair starts to fall.

At forty-eight the yang energy of the head begins to deplete, the face becomes sallow, the hair greys, and the teeth deteriorate.

By fifty-six years the liver energy weakens, causing the tendons to stiffen.

At sixty-four the tian kui dries up and the Jing is drained, resulting in kidney exhaustion, fatigue, and weakness.  The kidney reservoir becomes empty, marking the end of the power of conception.

We live in a cult of youth

We have become too squeamish to talk about ageing and bodily fluids; which is strange when you think about it, because it will happen to every one of us, if we’re lucky. I suppose that’s why we try to brush it under the carpet. 

southend acupuncture neck pain

Take funerals for example, which in our culture are often sad affairs.  The Toraja people in Indonesia, however, exhume the corpses of their relatives every year in what they call ‘The Ceremony of Cleaning Corpses’.  They clean them and dress them in new clothes and spend the day with them.  In Mexico, of course, they famously celebrate the Day of the Dead. And in Tibetan Buddhism the daily contemplation of death is positively encouraged.  Better to not be taken by surprise by something that is definitely coming.  We just don’t know when.

It is important that we are accepting of change. 

Some things are just inevitable.  We all age and we all experience illness and pain at some point in our lives.  So rather than focusing on the deterioration of our physical bodies, we should highlight the strengths that come with ageing.  The young may have tight skin and be able to stay up all night, but most do not have the wisdom that comes only with ageing.  Let me also add though that not all old people are wise!

 

If you have any questions about acupuncture, or any of the topics in my blogs, please do contact me.  Find out more about me, or my treatments  here.